Military Hans Högman
Copyright © Hans Högman 2017-06-30

History of the Royal Karlberg War Academy,

Sweden

 

Karlberg War Academy

The Royal War Academy in Karlberg (Kungliga Krigsakademin i Karlberg), Stockholm - Sweden, was inaugurated in 1792 and is the oldest war academy in the world still remaining at the same locality. The academy is located at Karlberg Palace, Stockholm. The first generation of cadets began their education in November 1792. Both army and navy cadets were, at this time, trained at the academy. In the beginning cadets were accepted at Karlberg at an age between 11 and 13 and the training/education of the cadets were for 5 years. In 1797 the period of training were reduced to 4 years and the age for admission to the training was raised to 14. The education at the academy contained training both in regular school subjects as well as training in military ones. To the right is an image of the Karlberg War Academy, Stockholm, Sweden. Free image, Wikipedia. At this time there were no demand that the officers had to pass an officer’s exam at the Karlberg War Academy in order to get a commission. There were also education/training for officers at the various regiments. The Karlberg cadets had to compete with cadets trained at the regiments and an disadvantage for the war academy cadets were the fact that they were lacking experience of commanding troops. On the other hand the war academy cadets had an advantage in getting a position as a staff officers. In 1835 it became compulsory for all officers to pass an official exam in order to receive a commission as officers. In 1867 it was ruled that the training and examination of offices was to be held at the War Academy in Karlberg. In 1852 it became necessary to have a degree from a high school (UK: grammar school) in order to be appointed for training at Karlberg. This was a step in changing the war academy into an academy primary focusing on military subjects. The transformation was completed in 1863 and the name of the academy was changed to “Krigsskolan i Karlberg”. In 1873 it was ruled that the cadets had to pass the regimental and recruit training in order to be admitted to Karlberg and from this point there was no longer any education in regular school subjects. From now on the training at Karlberg War Academy entirely focused on military subjects. Until 1867 both navy and army cadets were educated at Karlberg. The Navy cadets then moved to the new School of Naval Warfare. In 1999 the education of Army and Navy were unified again at Karlberg and since 2003 accompanied by air force officers. Today the War Academy at Karlberg is called “Militärhögskolan i Karlberg” (Military Academy Karlberg).

School of Naval Warfare

Between 1756 and 1792 there was a naval cadet school at Karlskrona Naval Base. However, in 1792 the cadet school was moved to the Karlberg War Academy in Stockholm. Until 1867 both navy and army cadets were educated at Karlberg. In 1867 the School of Naval Warfare (Sjökrigsskolan) was founded. The training of naval officer was then separated from the Karlberg War Academy and transferred to the new School of Naval Warfare. Between 1879 and 1943 the School of Naval Warfare was located at Skeppsholmen, Stockholm Naval Base. Between 1943 and 1987 the Navy academy was relocated to Näsby Palace, Täby, just north of Stockholm. From 1987 the School of Naval Warfare is back at Karlberg. There is also a Naval Combat School (Sjöstridsskola) at Karlskrona Naval Base. Further, a naval collage was founded in 1898. To the left is an image of the School of Naval Warfare at Näsby Palace, Täby, Stockholm, Sweden. Free image, Wikipedia.

Karlberg Palace

The War Academy is located to the Karlberg Palace, Stockholm. The palace is from the 1630’s and is named after the founder, Baron Carl Carlsson Gyllenhielm. In 1669 the castle was acquired by Chancellor Count Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie and the castle was now redesigned received its present appearance. In 1684 the castle became a royal property through the so-called Reduction and in 1792 it was handed over to the War Academy. During the regency of King Gustav IV, architect Carl Christoffer Gjörwell was ordered to enlarge the palace to accommodate the cadets, which in 1796 resulted in the elongated wings giving the palace much of its character.

Various Names of the War Academy

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Military Hans Högman
Copyright © Hans Högman 2017-08-20

History of the Royal

Karlberg War Academy,

Sweden

 

Karlberg War Academy

The Royal War Academy in Karlberg (Kungliga Krigsakademin i Karlberg), Stockholm - Sweden, was inaugurated in 1792 and is the oldest war academy in the world still remaining at the same locality. The academy is located at Karlberg Palace, Stockholm. The first generation of cadets began their education in November 1792. Both army and navy cadets were, at this time, trained at the academy. In the beginning cadets were accepted at Karlberg at an age between 11 and 13 and the training/education of the cadets were for 5 years. In 1797 the period of training were reduced to 4 years and the age for admission to the training was raised to 14. The education at the academy contained training both in regular school subjects as well as training in military ones. To the right is an image of the Karlberg War Academy, Stockholm, Sweden. Free image, Wikipedia. At this time there were no demand that the officers had to pass an officer’s exam at the Karlberg War Academy in order to get a commission. There were also education/training for officers at the various regiments. The Karlberg cadets had to compete with cadets trained at the regiments and an disadvantage for the war academy cadets were the fact that they were lacking experience of commanding troops. On the other hand the war academy cadets had an advantage in getting a position as a staff officers. In 1835 it became compulsory for all officers to pass an official exam in order to receive a commission as officers. In 1867 it was ruled that the training and examination of offices was to be held at the War Academy in Karlberg. In 1852 it became necessary to have a degree from a high school (UK: grammar school) in order to be appointed for training at Karlberg. This was a step in changing the war academy into an academy primary focusing on military subjects. The transformation was completed in 1863 and the name of the academy was changed to “Krigsskolan i Karlberg”. In 1873 it was ruled that the cadets had to pass the regimental and recruit training in order to be admitted to Karlberg and from this point there was no longer any education in regular school subjects. From now on the training at Karlberg War Academy entirely focused on military subjects. Until 1867 both navy and army cadets were educated at Karlberg. The Navy cadets then moved to the new School of Naval Warfare. In 1999 the education of Army and Navy were unified again at Karlberg and since 2003 accompanied by air force officers. Today the War Academy at Karlberg is called “Militärhögskolan i Karlberg” (Military Academy Karlberg).

School of Naval Warfare

Between 1756 and 1792 there was a naval cadet school at Karlskrona Naval Base. However, in 1792 the cadet school was moved to the Karlberg War Academy in Stockholm. Until 1867 both navy and army cadets were educated at Karlberg. In 1867 the School of Naval Warfare  (Sjökrigsskolan) was founded. The training of naval officer was then separated from the Karlberg War Academy and transferred to the new School of Naval Warfare. Between 1879 and 1943 the School of Naval Warfare was located at Skeppsholmen, Stockholm Naval Base. Between 1943 and 1987 the Navy academy was relocated to Näsby Palace, Täby, just north of Stockholm. From 1987 the School of Naval Warfare is back at Karlberg. There is also a Naval Combat School (Sjöstridsskola) at Karlskrona Naval Base. Further, a naval collage was founded in 1898. To the left is an image of the School of Naval Warfare at Näsby Palace, Täby, Stockholm, Sweden. Free image, Wikipedia.

Karlberg Palace

The War Academy is located to the Karlberg Palace, Stockholm. The palace is from the 1630’s and is named after the founder, Baron Carl Carlsson Gyllenhielm. In 1669 the castle was acquired by Chancellor Count Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie and the castle was now redesigned received its present appearance. In 1684 the castle became a royal property through the so- called Reduction and in 1792 it was handed over to the War Academy. During the regency of King Gustav IV, architect Carl Christoffer Gjörwell was ordered to enlarge the palace to accommodate the cadets, which in 1796 resulted in the elongated wings giving the palace much of its character.

Various Names of the War Academy